Anything But Bingo

Resources to enhance the daily life of people living with dementia

EASY 'STAINED GLASS EFFECT' ART PROJECT 

This arts and craft project is easy, uses everyday items and can be adapted to match the abilities of someone living with dementia.

I'm excited about this post because arts and crafts is one of my favourite activities to do both personally and at work. This particular project worked incredibly well when we did it in a care home and the results became a much admired part of our art show. I've called it a stained glass window but it isn't transparent, it just gives the colourful effect of a window. Theoretically I think it should be called a foil relief, but that doesn't sound as pretty as they look!

I've listed everything you need and described and photographed each step, so hopefully it should be easy to follow. I've also included ways to adapt the activity at each step. One of the most exciting things about creative activities is that I start with an idea about how a finished project should look and afterwards we end up with a selection of completely different results; each one is unique, each one is personal, each one is perfect. It doesn't matter if your stained glass window looks like mine, if it is all one colour, if the lines aren't straight or if there are holes in the foil. What matters is if you can both enjoy making it, so try to see youself as a guide rather than only a demonstrator and let the activity take its own course. It can take a bit of practice to find the balance between showing someone how to do something and doing the whole activity yourself on their behalf.

The stained glass window you make can be put on display, hung in the window or even given away as a gift. I always make a point of making sure that any art or craft creation is used in some way. I think it is important that activity should be purposeful even if that purpose is to have something pretty to look at.

What you need:

  • cardboard - you can use a cereal box or packing box, or indeed any cardboard you can find
  • string or wool
  • glue - either a glue stick / pritstick or a liquid glue
  • scissors
  • sellotape
  • tin foil - I've used extra-thick foil but a thinner foil will be fine
  • coloured marker pens - I prefer Sharpies but any marker pens will do the job. As I found out today, felt tip pens don't work!

 

What to do:

  1. Cut out a square or oblong piece of cardboard. Don't make it too big as it will take longer to colour in. Mine is 13cm x 15cm. Adapt: Person can hold cardboard as you cut it.
  2. Cut lengths of string or wool that are a little longer than the card in both directions. Adapt: Person can hold string as you cut, or visa versa.
  3. Rip off or cut a piece of foil that is at least 5cm bigger than your card on each side. Adapt: Put your hand over theirs to help tear the foil / person can hold foil box as you rip a piece off.
  4. Spread glue all over the carboard. If you are using a glue stick / pritstick be generous with it. Adapt: "take it in turns" so that you can fill in any gaps left behind / put your hand over theirs to guide the glueing.
  5. Lay the pieces of string over the card as shown in the photo. You are aiming to create shapes that you will later colour in. Adapt: Ask where they would like the string to go / take an end of the string each so that you can guide its position.
  6. Place your foil over the top of the cardboard and string. Using the palm of your hand and pads of your fingers start to press down, paying particular attention to either side of the string. As you do this you will see the pattern of the string start to appear. It is easy to pierce the foil if you use fingernails to push the foil down so try to avoid this. Adapt: Ask the person to place their hand on top of yours as you push the foil down / ask them to concentrate on one area at a time rather than be overwhelmed or confused by the entire piece.
  7. You should now be able to see each piece of string and the shapes that they have created. Turn over the cardboard.
  8. Fold over the edges of the foil and string. You can describe this as like wrapping a present which may help the person understand what you are asking them to do. Then sellotape the edges down to secure them. Turn your cardboard back over so that you can see the front.
  9. You can now start colouring in the shapes. You can see some normal felt-tip pens in this photo. They didn't work so you need to use marker pens like the Sharpie I have in my hand or a permanent marker pen like the fat blue one in the photo. You can often find these at pound shops. It doesn't matter if the colour overlaps, or there isn't much variety of colour. Try not to push down with the pen as you'll pierce the foil, but again, it doesn't matter if you do. Adapt: You can do some of the colouring too if the quantity of space to fill is overwhelming but try to do it at the same time rather than taking over.

Enjoy the final piece of art and share the success with your visitors and each other.

 

I hope that you will have a go at this project. I would love to see photos of your final pieces so please do share them on the Facebook page.

Posted by Jenny Trott Wednesday, August 26, 2015 12:00:00 AM Categories: Activities Advanced dementia Alzheimers Art Craft

               Who am I?

 

Jenny

I am a forty-something mother of two.

I love learning and creating, and do

what I can to improve the well-being

of people living with dementia.

I have worked in residential dementia

care for a few years and hope that I

have something useful to share.

 

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